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Find | One Herald https://oneherald.com.au Fri, 25 Nov 2016 13:31:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.5 85715709 Modern Love: Catfishing Strangers to Find Myself https://oneherald.com.au/modern-love-catfishing-strangers-to-find-myself/ https://oneherald.com.au/modern-love-catfishing-strangers-to-find-myself/#respond Fri, 25 Nov 2016 13:31:07 +0000 http://oneherald.com.au/modern-love-catfishing-strangers-to-find-myself/ Using Pamela’s age and some of her defining features to create my new persona, I logged in to the chat room as “CharlottaDD35.” Then the messages came pouring in. I accepted an invitation to play billiards from Jarkko25. A screen popped up, and we were escorted to a private room, where a question from him ...

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Using Pamela’s age and some of her defining features to create my new persona, I logged in to the chat room as “CharlottaDD35.” Then the messages came pouring in.

I accepted an invitation to play billiards from Jarkko25. A screen popped up, and we were escorted to a private room, where a question from him appeared in the message box: “Are you feeling frisky?”

“Why do you ask?” I typed.

“Is it tight?” he asked.

I didn’t entirely understand what he meant, but I knew it was dirty.

I waited a moment and then wrote, “Yes.”

“Nice,” he replied. “Age?”

“35,” I wrote. “But I love younger men.”

“That’s hot. What do you look like?”

I quickly Googled “Pamela+Anderson” and described what I saw in the search results: “179 cm, blonde. I like to wear heels and tight dresses.”

“Mmmh. Do you have big breasts?”

“Yes.”

“D-cups?”

“Yes.” I was determined to give him everything he wanted.

“What sort of men do you like?” he asked.

Thinking of James Bond movies, I said: “Someone like Pierce Brosnan. Someone who takes charge. Someone stylish.”

“I can definitely take charge,” he said.

I took a sip of my Kool-Aid. “Six-pack?” I asked. Now was the time for me to be demanding; otherwise it wouldn’t seem real. Having a six-pack was a thing I’d heard was desirable.

“Not really,” he said. “But I have one in the fridge.”

I laughed. Maybe this guy was nice.

What followed was my first-ever cybersex session, with him typing suggestive remarks and me typing, “Mmmh,” which seemed to work for him.

My masquerade went on for months. I became a master of giving men what they wanted. The sheer number of interested men meant I could be picky, too. I wanted a conventionally handsome and sexy young man. And since I was a woman of such high caliber, I didn’t think it was too much to ask.

I tailored my story to suit the other participants’ interests. I was married with two children. I had a rich husband who couldn’t satisfy me sexually. We lived in an enormous glass house with a private beach in one of Helsinki’s most exclusive suburbs. And since I was a bored, lonely housewife, I always needed someone to come over and take care of things.

I found amateur photos of naked women online to send to the men and patched up whatever incongruities emerged: “The picture doesn’t have a face because I don’t want my husband to find out I’ve been posting my photos online” or “I never give my number to strangers until I’ve gotten to know them well enough.”

The back story also allowed me an escape in case my parents got home. “My husband just walked in, so I have to go now,” I would say. “Can’t wait to talk to you soon.”

I liked this online seduction much more than I imagined I would. I told myself it was the danger: of getting caught, of fooling the men, of breaking rules. Whatever the case, I’d become addicted. Every day after school, I would continue my quest for the perfect man.

That’s when I came across Jussi. He described himself as a man who was 23, loved the gym and had a six-pack. He played ice hockey and basketball, masculine sports I’d always wanted to be good at. But he was emotive too. He sent me messages such as, “You sound like an incredible woman” and “I can sense such warmth in these messages of yours.”

He asked me the usual questions: What are you wearing? Where do you like to do it? How do you like it?

I provided my usual answers: I was wearing nothing (“I just got out of the shower and like to cool my body naturally”). I liked doing it on every surface of the house and particularly in public places. All the yoga I did made me incredibly flexible, and I loved being lifted up and twisted into adventurous sexual positions.

But then he began to talk about what he hoped to find on the site: namely, a relationship that was real and meaningful. I agreed I was tired of sleeping around too. Usually I blocked a man once he began to insist on meeting in person, but Jussi was patient and sweet. I wanted to continue talking to him.

We logged in at the same time, day after day. I adjusted the schedule around my school days by saying, “I’ll need to drop off the kids first, so I won’t be home until 3 p.m. tomorrow.” He worked night shifts as a security guard, so he was always online when I needed him to be.

After a few weeks, he said: “Can we meet already? Please Charlotta.” He told me that he was tired of chatting and that if I didn’t say yes, he wouldn’t believe I was a real person.

What we had was real to me, and I didn’t want to disappoint him. So I agreed.

We set a date for 7 p.m. a week later. We agreed to meet on a street corner in the center of Helsinki, mere blocks from where I lived. I hoped we would recognize each other simply because we had been talking for so long and had such a strong connection.

As the days passed, however, the impossibility of it began to dawn on me. Even if I were to go meet him and get past the initial explanations, I could never become what he imagined me to be. And something else dawned on me as well: I was starting to realize I might be gay, and that’s why I was different from everyone else.

At 7 p.m. that evening, my mother put sausages and French fries on the table for dinner. I sat in silence, answering her questions with an absent-minded yes or no. Looking at the clock, it hit me: Jussi was now standing out in the cold night, alone.

I wondered how long he would wait: Twenty minutes? Thirty? A full hour? Would he camp out at a nearby cafe while wistfully looking out of the window, searching the passing crowd for Charlotta’s face?

I imagined him sitting on the bus on his way home to the suburbs, hoping there’d been a mix-up: I’d either forgotten the day or mistaken the time. I imagined him logging on to the chat room and scanning the list for my user name, only to come up empty: I’d blocked him to make sure I didn’t have to read through any excruciating messages.

A couple of hours after dinner, my mother came to knock on my door to tell me it was bedtime. As I lay alone in the dark, I felt the same loneliness Jussi must have been feeling.

I wish there had been a way for me to tell him what his online companionship meant to me: That he had made it possible for me to be myself in a strictly gendered world of Pamela Andersons and James Bonds. That he had helped me believe I was funny, interesting and worth talking to. That he had, if only by his presence, made it possible for me to begin to process my sexuality.

By pretending to be someone I was not, I had shown him my true self, one I had been too afraid to reveal to anyone else. And ultimately, I was able to embrace that true self, an acceptance that would allow me — years later, as an adult in New York City — to find real love as a real person.

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Tech Tip: How Those Wireless Emergency Alerts Find You https://oneherald.com.au/tech-tip-how-those-wireless-emergency-alerts-find-you/ https://oneherald.com.au/tech-tip-how-those-wireless-emergency-alerts-find-you/#respond Thu, 29 Sep 2016 03:26:48 +0000 http://oneherald.com.au/tech-tip-how-those-wireless-emergency-alerts-find-you/ Q. When I get an emergency alert on my phone for a certain area, how does the system know I’m in that location? Do these messages count against my monthly limit? A. The Wireless Emergency Alerts system, which allows government authorities — like local law enforcement or the Federal Emergency Management Agency — to push ...

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Q. When I get an emergency alert on my phone for a certain area, how does the system know I’m in that location? Do these messages count against my monthly limit?

A. The Wireless Emergency Alerts system, which allows government authorities — like local law enforcement or the Federal Emergency Management Agency — to push out public safety warnings to mobile devices, can be restricted to certain geographic locations. Once officials have decided the range of the emergency zone, the alert is broadcast from the cell towers in that designated area.

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Emergency alerts from government and public-safety officials do not count toward your text message allowance. Credit The New York Times

According to the Federal Communications Commission, participating wireless carriers are “generally required to send the alerts to a geographic area no larger than the county or counties affected by the emergency situation.” The agency also notes that carriers may be able to pinpoint smaller areas to receive alerts.

Targeting the alerts to precise geographic areas means that people in Indianapolis do not get flood warnings meant for residents of the Gulf Coast, or even those for nearby Kentucky. If you are visiting a place that is in an emergency situation, your phone should get the alert messages even though you don’t live there.

About 100 wireless carriers around the country participate voluntarily in the W.E.A. system, including the major national companies AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless. Prepaid phones can also receive the alerts, as long as the carrier participates in the W.E.A. program and the device is capable of getting the message. Carriers that do not participate in the program are required by the F.C.C. to notify their customers.

The emergency alerts are free and usually enabled on a phone by default, and they do not count against any text-message limits in your monthly data plan. Although the alerts resemble Short Message Service (SMS) communications, they are not standard text messages and are delivered using a different technology.

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Want to Find Fulfillment at Last? Think Like a Designer https://oneherald.com.au/want-to-find-fulfillment-at-last-think-like-a-designer/ https://oneherald.com.au/want-to-find-fulfillment-at-last-think-like-a-designer/#respond Sat, 17 Sep 2016 12:08:12 +0000 http://oneherald.com.au/want-to-find-fulfillment-at-last-think-like-a-designer/ As self-actualization messengers, the two men are an odd couple. Mr. Burnett, 59, is a self-contained, acerbic, existential atheist with an earring, while Mr. Evans, 63, is an outgoing, verbose, practicing Christian with the gray beard of a philosopher. Both are Stanford grads, and while they have accomplished résumés (Mr. Burnett helped to design the ...

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As self-actualization messengers, the two men are an odd couple. Mr. Burnett, 59, is a self-contained, acerbic, existential atheist with an earring, while Mr. Evans, 63, is an outgoing, verbose, practicing Christian with the gray beard of a philosopher.

Both are Stanford grads, and while they have accomplished résumés (Mr. Burnett helped to design the original “Star Wars” toys and worked at Apple before becoming executive director of Stanford’s design program; Mr. Evans also worked at Apple and co-founded Electronic Arts, the game company), each said his younger self would have been well served by the course.

For his part, Mr. Evans struggled as a biology student, a major he chose because he had watched a Jacques Cousteau television special as a boy, and one he clung to because, he said, “I don’t think I had conscious permission to not know what I was doing.”

He switched to mechanical engineering and graduated with a master’s degree in the mid-’70s. But when an Apple recruiter called, he initially hung up, because he was bored by computers. In doing so, Mr. Evans said ruefully, he violated several principles of “Designing Your Life,” among them staying open to “latent wonderfulness.”

“If you’re wrong, you go: ‘Oh, computers are boring. O.K., I’m going home now,’” Mr. Evans explained. “ ‘Yes’ is easy. ‘No’ is hard to come back from.”

Mr. Burnett had an easier time on the surface, finding his way to the design program at Stanford and a lifelong vocation. Through a professor mentor, he landed a job as a toy designer and went on to greater success.

But, he said: “My method was a blind walk. I didn’t have any strategies. I trusted my intuition, but I worried that I didn’t know what I was doing.”

Before joining forces, they hashed out the concepts they had been developing over a two-pitcher lunch at a Palo Alto beer garden then known as Zott’s (short for Rissotti’s; it is now called the Alpine Inn), using their life experiences as grist for the curriculum.

In a place like Stanford, where yearly in-state tuition is about $ 50,000, they thought it was worthwhile to send students into the world with practical knowledge about how to find a fulfilling job and excel at it.

They began holding workshops for adults a few years ago, including for the employees of Google. The workshop and the book are an effort to take their approach beyond its cloistered campus setting.

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The atrium of the design school at Stanford University. Credit Jason Henry for The New York Times

As Mr. Evans put it, “We’re trying to give this thing away.”

Try, Fail, Fail Again

If you can get past the jargon-heavy language and Silicon Valley preciousness, many of the principles of “Designing Your Life” are, in fact, helpful. Design thinking, as rendered in the book, is about treating life in a more improvisational way. It’s a welcome counterbalance to the data-driven, engineering mind-set gripping the culture.

Follow Mr. Burnett’s and Mr. Evans’s teachings, and the anxiety-ridden process of decision making suddenly seems more playful. Their method is experiential and accepts that failure is part of the process.

Central to the philosophy is prototyping, a concept borrowed from how product designers work. Let’s say you’re thinking of changing careers. Interview someone who does the job you’re considering. Better yet, ask to shadow them for a day, or work in the field on weekends. If it feels right, take it a step further; if it doesn’t, move on.

“It’s a classic form of design,” Mr. Burnett said. “You build a lot of stuff, you try a lot of stuff. But it’s always less than the whole product.”

Prototyping big decisions like a career change or a move, meanwhile, guards against blowing up your life to rush headlong into the alluring unknown, or worse, taking no action for years, unhappily.

Emma Wood, a 25-year-old Stanford graduate and a consultant at McKinsey & Company who took “Designing Your Life” as an undergraduate, said the class released the pressure she felt about the life she would face after graduation.

“Your whole future and happiness aren’t tied to this one plan working out,” she said. “You can make mistakes. Failure is good.”

The capstone of the Stanford class, and a key part of the book, is an assignment to come up with three “Odyssey Plans” that map out the next five years of your life in radically different ways.

The activity is designed to reinforce the sense of multiple viable options, unlock the imagination and eliminate the attractive power of the unknown alternative.

Lingtong Sun, who graduated from Stanford last year, said he continues to use the “Odyssey Plan” and other concepts from the class to decide his long-term career.

“On the grand level, I haven’t figured out what I want to do yet,” said Mr. Sun, who works as a software engineer for a tech start-up in the Bay Area. “But I’m more open to trying something and seeing how it goes. It’s that bias toward action. You can’t think your way into your future.”

Breaking down the system to its basic parts, as a designer would, Mr. Evans said, “There are only two things we offer in the class: ideas and tools.”

He added, “If you think with these ideas rather than the ones you had before, and you use these tools, we believe your chance of building and getting what you want will go up.”

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Bay Area Start-Ups Find Low-Cost Outposts in Arizona https://oneherald.com.au/bay-area-start-ups-find-low-cost-outposts-in-arizona/ https://oneherald.com.au/bay-area-start-ups-find-low-cost-outposts-in-arizona/#respond Tue, 23 Aug 2016 09:39:26 +0000 http://oneherald.com.au/bay-area-start-ups-find-low-cost-outposts-in-arizona/ The company’s Scottsdale, Ariz., office has Silicon Valley perks like catered lunches and a massage room, along with some local touches, like a “No Weapons” sign to remind employees that open-carry laws do not extend onto company property. Wages, taxes and energy cost about 25 percent less in Phoenix than they do in San Francisco, ...

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The company’s Scottsdale, Ariz., office has Silicon Valley perks like catered lunches and a massage room, along with some local touches, like a “No Weapons” sign to remind employees that open-carry laws do not extend onto company property.

Wages, taxes and energy cost about 25 percent less in Phoenix than they do in San Francisco, according to an index of business costs compiled by Moody’s Analytics.

Housing is much cheaper. The median home price in the Phoenix metropolitan area is $ 221,000, according to Zillow. In San Francisco, it is $ 812,000.

For Ms. Rogers and others, that is a far bigger perk than an extra vacation or a raise in California. Instead of renting a rundown house in Redwood City and commuting an hour or more to work, she now lives 10 minutes from the office in a house that is twice the size — with mortgage payments that are half the cost of her California rent.

“When I had a kid, it forced the decision for me,” Ms. Rogers said.

Hordes of young dreamy entrepreneurs still flock to the Bay Area each year in search of venture capital. Silicon Valley is to tech entrepreneurs what Hollywood is to actors, and the region continues to significantly outpace the nation in creating engineering jobs.

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Kate Rogers, director of people operations for Weebly, at its offices in Scottsdale, Ariz. Credit Caitlin O’Hara for The New York Times

But as companies grow and add large numbers of sales and customer service jobs, “it’s less about survival and having everybody in the same room,” said Lawrence Coburn, chief executive of DoubleDutch, a San Francisco maker of software for live events that recently laid off a quarter of its staff to try to become profitable sooner.

This year, the company opened a downtown Phoenix office with sales and customer service jobs. “San Francisco is a terrible place for entry-level people,” Mr. Coburn said, because the infrastructure and housing are “failing.”

Local economic development agencies and real estate developers are doing what they can to keep the movement going. Take, for instance, the downtown Phoenix offices of Gainsight, a Redwood City company whose software helps companies track and retain customers. In November, Gainsight opened its 12-person Phoenix office, with modernist touches like exposed ceilings and concrete floors in the hallways, along with the crammed desks and open floor plan favored by tech companies.

The only private spaces are a handful of conference rooms, including one that has a Ping-Pong table and is decorated with posters with famous quotes by luminaries including Mother Teresa.

Most of the building’s floors have a more traditional layout full of offices and carpet. But the building’s owner, Ironline Partners, renovated the more open floor with an eye toward software companies, of which there are now three, including Gainsight.

“Since those guys moved in, we’ve blown out the entire 15th floor and the entire fifth floor to do more of the same,” said D. J. Fernandes, an architect at Ironline Partners who designed the spaces.

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Scott Salkin, left, and Kyle Burnett, founders of Allbound, in their Phoenix offices. Credit Caitlin O’Hara for The New York Times

The Bay Area has never been especially cheap, and tech companies have a long history of moving their more expensive and labor-intensive functions to second-tier cities where land and labor are less expensive. Intel, the semiconductor giant, was founded in the Silicon Valley in 1968, and by 1979, it had manufacturing facilities outside Portland, Ore., and Phoenix.

But as the latest exodus gathers steam, these outlying cities hope some of the higher-paying engineering jobs will start moving as well.

“We don’t want to be San Francisco’s back office — we need more creators here,” said Scott Salkin, a founder and the chief executive of Allbound, which is based in Phoenix, makes sales software and has offices down the hall from Gainsight’s.

Chris Camacho, chief executive of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, says better-paying jobs will follow, since companies prefer to expand in cities where they already have offices. That has been true for Intel, which over the last few decades has added a number of different positions to its original manufacturing hubs.

This is why part of Mr. Camacho’s strategy is to focus on Bay Area start-ups just as they reach a growth spurt. “The reality is all of these companies are going to hit a pain point once they hit more than 50 employees,” he said.

But while Phoenix is recruiting companies, its technology scene lacks some crucial elements. Mr. Salkin, from Allbound, said he still flies to the Bay Area once a month for networking or other events. “We’re doing amazing things here,” he said, “but we’ve got a way to go.”

Mr. Salkin added that for technology companies, which hire people from all kinds of backgrounds, Arizona’s socially conservative politics can be a form of cultural baggage. For example, the former governor, Jan Brewer, signed one of the nation’s toughest immigration laws in 2010, and same-sex marriage was illegal until a federal court overturned a voter-approved ban in 2014.

In San Francisco, “you can come from any walk of life and feel pretty much accepted and safe,” Mr. Salkin said. “You struggle to say that here right now. I think that’s changing, but it has not been the case in Arizona, and I think that’s a big thing.”

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Lyft Is Said to Fail to Find a Buyer, Despite Talks With Several Companies https://oneherald.com.au/lyft-is-said-to-fail-to-find-a-buyer-despite-talks-with-several-companies/ https://oneherald.com.au/lyft-is-said-to-fail-to-find-a-buyer-despite-talks-with-several-companies/#respond Fri, 19 Aug 2016 20:14:54 +0000 http://oneherald.com.au/lyft-is-said-to-fail-to-find-a-buyer-despite-talks-with-several-companies/ Photo Lyft was valued at $ 5.5 billion after an investment round by G.M. and others in January, making it one of the more pre-eminent unicorn companies in Silicon Valley. Credit Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Lyft Ride-hailing companies increasingly face a brutal set of competitive conditions. Lyft, the second-biggest ride-hailing company in the United States ...

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Lyft was valued at $ 5.5 billion after an investment round by G.M. and others in January, making it one of the more pre-eminent unicorn companies in Silicon Valley. Credit Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Lyft

Ride-hailing companies increasingly face a brutal set of competitive conditions. Lyft, the second-biggest ride-hailing company in the United States behind Uber, has acknowledged how tough the industry has become — but has found that its options are limited.

The company, which is based in San Francisco, has in recent months held talks or made approaches to sell itself to companies including General Motors, Apple, Google, Amazon, Uber and Didi Chuxing, according to a dozen people who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the discussions were private.

Lyft’s discussions were most serious with G.M., which is one of the ride-hailing company’s largest investors. Still, G.M. never made a written offer to buy Lyft, said the people, and in the end, Lyft did not find a buyer.

Lyft is not in danger of closing down and has a cash cushion of $ 1.4 billion, these people added, so the company will continue as an independent entity.

Still, the talks underline how difficult it has become to operate in the ride-hailing market, where people can book rides from drivers through a smartphone app. While ride-hailing companies do not own their own fleets of cars and instead rely on drivers who have their own vehicles, the business is highly capital intensive, requiring deep pockets for expansion into new markets, marketing and recruitment of new drivers. Venture capitalists and other investors have poured billions of dollars into the companies.

Tensions have escalated in the industry in recent months as some ride-hailing companies have grappled with their most expensive operations. This month, for example, Uber, which has raised far more money than Lyft, agreed to sell its Chinese subsidiary to Didi Chuxing, the biggest ride-hailing company in China. The deal freed Uber from a cash-sucking battle for dominance in the China market.

But the move also disrupted a global alliance that Lyft had struck with Didi and others to fight Uber. Lyft has not stated whether it will continue working with Didi, but the dissolution of a partnership could stymie Lyft’s growth prospects.

Representatives from Lyft, Google, Amazon, Apple, G.M. and Uber declined to comment on talks. The Information earlier reported on talks between G.M. and Lyft.

The effort to sell Lyft was aided by bankers at Qatalyst Partners, the boutique investment bank founded by the veteran Silicon Valley banker Frank Quattrone, said the people with knowledge of the talks. Qatalyst declined to comment.

Lyft failed to find a buyer partly because of cost, the people said. Lyft was valued at $ 5.5 billion after an investment round by G.M. and others in January, making it one of the more pre-eminent unicorn companies in Silicon Valley. Any sale would most likely have to fetch a premium at more than Lyft’s last valuation.

Lyft also struggled to find a buyer because of the challenging economics of the ride-hailing business. Companies like Lyft and Uber typically take 20 percent to 25 percent of the cost of each ride. With Lyft drivers expected to pick up an estimated $ 2 billion or so in fares this year, that meant Lyft’s annual revenue would be about $ 400 million, according to a person familiar with the company’s financials.

That $ 400 million shrinks after marketing costs are factored in. To win loyalty from drivers who can also work for Uber, Lyft also sometimes lets drivers keep that 20 percent to 25 percent of some rides, so the company effectively earns no revenue in those situations. And in some cases, Lyft provides drivers with additional cash incentives simply to get out on the road, adding to its costs.

Lyft is not profitable, said a person briefed on the company’s finances. Yet it has a $ 1.4 billion cash hoard, the person added, and the company thinks that will shield it as it works toward achieving profitability.

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Bits: Intel’s New Mission: Find Fresh Uses for Its Famous Paranoia https://oneherald.com.au/bits-intels-new-mission-find-fresh-uses-for-its-famous-paranoia/ https://oneherald.com.au/bits-intels-new-mission-find-fresh-uses-for-its-famous-paranoia/#respond Mon, 15 Aug 2016 00:51:06 +0000 http://oneherald.com.au/bits-intels-new-mission-find-fresh-uses-for-its-famous-paranoia/ Photo Brian Krzanich, Intel’s chief executive, is scheduled to speak at the company’s Developer Forum in San Francisco this week. Credit Ethan Miller/Getty Images Andy Grove, the renowned chief executive of Intel, who died in March, coined a phrase beloved in Silicon Valley: “Only the paranoid survive.” That sounds cool, if you like your capitalism ...

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Brian Krzanich, Intel’s chief executive, is scheduled to speak at the company’s Developer Forum in San Francisco this week. Credit Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Andy Grove, the renowned chief executive of Intel, who died in March, coined a phrase beloved in Silicon Valley: “Only the paranoid survive.”

That sounds cool, if you like your capitalism fierce. That idea, however, turns out to have some significant downsides.

Intel is the world’s biggest semiconductor company because when Mr. Grove was in charge, it dominated the personal computer industry and was an important player in the associated business in computer servers.

Today, the PC market is shrinking, hurting Intel’s profits. The server-chip industry is still strong, thanks to the rise of cloud computing at companies like Facebook and Google. Cloud companies engineer server chips in ways that make very powerful and flexible systems used by millions of people.

But Intel missed joining a number of other markets that did not look like the PC business, particularly smartphones. It is scrambling for a place in sensors (or what is called the internet of things), wireless networking, autonomous vehicles and other hot areas, as computing spreads from traditional computers to nearly every machine.

“The mistake was, when you grow with great leadership and great success, your paranoia is focused on the one thing that is delivering that,” Brian Krzanich, Intel’s current chief executive, said in an interview.

From PC-dominated computing, he said, we are now “where computing is constantly shifting.” Mr. Krzanich says he is still a strong believer in paranoia, but he must turn that vigilant anxiety in a lot of directions at once. Cloud computing may be Intel’s core, but Mr. Krzanich has to feed it from chips in many markets.

The effect of those changes will be seen this week as Intel holds its Developer Forum in San Francisco. The conference is where the hard-core geeks of computing gather to hear about what’s coming in the realms of processing power, memory and other technology that enables the modern world.

Giant tech trade shows like the International CES, held in Las Vegas every January, are focused on hot products. Developer events may be nerd-fests, but they say more about the technology world, and where a company hopes to be in two or three years.

At the Developer Forum, Mr. Krzanich will deliver a keynote speech, in which he is expected to dwell on topics like virtual reality, sensors and artificial intelligence, which was in the news last week when Intel bought an A.I. start-up, Nervana Systems, that has technology that will be used in Intel’s data-center chips.

Shifting gears for the giant chip company is no easy task. “Intel has four main business lines — PCs, mobile, internet of things and servers — and it’s hitting on one of them,” said Patrick Gelsinger, a longtime Intel executive who is now chief executive of the software company VMware. The factories where Intel builds chips “now cost $ 10 billion, at least,” each to set up, he said, “and the competition is catching up.”

In April, Intel announced it was cutting its work force by 12,000 people, about 11 percent of workers. About a quarter of the executives who report to Mr. Krzanich come from other companies, a big deal at a place where leaders rise through the ranks over decades.

In his speech, Mr. Krzanich may stay away from talking about wearable devices. Last month, Intel withdrew a health-monitoring watch that had some nice capabilities but sometimes burned its wearers’ skin. Even so, Mr. Krzanich said, the heart-monitoring capabilities of that watch will find their way into a device Intel plans to make with the athletics brand New Balance.

The part he is looking forward to, Mr. Kraznich said, is a one-hour question-and-answer session with 200 elite developers. “It’s a much broader group” than even a couple of years ago, he said. “People writing for machine learning and A.I., networking chips, how virtual reality feeds into PCs.” Even in decline, PC chips still make up half of Intel’s revenue.

If these things catch on, Intel will sell more chips to those businesses and create new demand for cloud computing, because most devices are now connected to the cloud.

Even so, another pillar of the Intel mythology, the unchanging nature of Moore’s Law, is getting revised. Named for the Intel co-founder Gordon Moore, it states that a chip’s power doubles every 18 to 24 months without a rise in costs. Mr. Grove’s paranoia championed and fed on Moore’s Law, as Intel strove to achieve profit from that computing cadence.

Silicon Valley treats Moore’s Law as if it is immutable, and with even more reverence than it does paranoia. But it was not a scientific law; it was always an observation about the behavior of a market for computers and software, which paid off at a rate to justify increasing investment in making chips.

It is changing, Mr. Krzanich said, because phones, sensors and cloud systems develop at different rates. “It’s lengthened to 24 to 36 months,” he said. “The performance of the ecosystem is much more than Moore’s Law.”

That is why Intel is in the wireless and networking fields, and is working on a new kind of three-dimensional memory chip, which Mr. Krzanich said would be out at the end of this year, that can speed performance of big-data-type calculations sevenfold.

There would be a historical precedent to that shift. Years ago, Intel’s main business was in memory chips, a market that collapsed three decades ago, leading the company to move toward making number-crunching processors for PCs. That shift, which arguably saved the company, was the lesson that led to Mr. Grove’s paranoia.

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Trump urges Russian hackers to find Clinton’s deleted emails https://oneherald.com.au/trump-urges-russian-hackers-to-find-clintons-deleted-emails/ https://oneherald.com.au/trump-urges-russian-hackers-to-find-clintons-deleted-emails/#respond Thu, 28 Jul 2016 08:06:06 +0000 http://oneherald.com.au/trump-urges-russian-hackers-to-find-clintons-deleted-emails/ NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Wednesday, July 27, 2016, 12:21 PM Hack away! Donald Trump Wednesday urged Russian hackers to find the thousands of emails Hillary Clinton erased from her private server. “Russia, if you are listening,” he told reporters, “I hope you are able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing. I think you ...

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Wednesday, July 27, 2016, 12:21 PM

Hack away!

Donald Trump Wednesday urged Russian hackers to find the thousands of emails Hillary Clinton erased from her private server.

“Russia, if you are listening,” he told reporters, “I hope you are able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing. I think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press.”

Russian hackers are accused of sneaking into the Democratic National Committee’s email system and leaking thousands of embarrassing missives.

KING: To stop Donald Trump, I’ll be voting for Hillary Clinton

“They probably have her 33,000 emails that she lost and deleted. You’d see some beauties, so we’ll see,” Trump said during a press conference at his Miami hotel.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump reacts as he speaks about former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's email issues during a campaign rally at the Sharonville Convention Center, Wednesday, July 6.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump reacts as he speaks about former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s email issues during a campaign rally at the Sharonville Convention Center, Wednesday, July 6.

(John Minchillo/AP)

Clinton handed over 30,000 work-related emails from her private server to the State Department. But another 30,000 were deleted because she claimed they had not relation to her public duties as Secretary of State.

Clinton’s campaign slammed the blustering billionaire’s hacker hopes.

“This has to be the first time that a major presidential candidate has actively encouraged a foreign power to conduct espionage against his political opponent,” Clinton spokesman Jake Sullivan said. “That’s not hyperbole, those are just the facts. This has gone from being a matter of curiosity, and a matter of politics, to being a national security issue.”

Man who tried to rush stage at Trump rally pleads guilty

As for the DNC hack, Democrats and some security experts believe the Kremlin is attempting to sway the election for Trump, who has espoused his love for Vladimir Putin’s leadership style.

A OCT. 18, 2011, FILE PHOTO; POOL PHOTO

In this Oct. 18, 2011, file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton checks her Blackberry from a desk inside a C-17 military plane upon her departure from Malta, in the Mediterranean Sea, bound for Tripoli, Libya.

(Kevin Lamarque/AP)

The Trump campaign maintains that’s just an excuse to distract the public from the emails.

The released messages showed top DNC officials apparently working to support Clinton while taking shots at her rival Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Party chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz announced her resignation Sunday as a result.

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Fashion Industry Scrambles to Find a Use for Snapchat https://oneherald.com.au/fashion-industry-scrambles-to-find-a-use-for-snapchat/ https://oneherald.com.au/fashion-industry-scrambles-to-find-a-use-for-snapchat/#respond Thu, 04 Feb 2016 16:11:27 +0000 http://oneherald.com.au/fashion-industry-scrambles-to-find-a-use-for-snapchat/ Photo Burberry posted teasers on Snapchat before London Fashion Week last year. Credit Tom Jamieson for The New York Times LONDON — Here’s a question: What do looks from the catwalks at New York Men’s Fashion Week, a video of Gigi Hadid singing a duet with Taylor Swift and the latest cover of the annual ...

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Burberry posted teasers on Snapchat before London Fashion Week last year. Credit Tom Jamieson for The New York Times

LONDON — Here’s a question: What do looks from the catwalks at New York Men’s Fashion Week, a video of Gigi Hadid singing a duet with Taylor Swift and the latest cover of the annual Hollywood issue of Vanity Fair have in common?

Answer: This week, all debuted exclusively on Snapchat, confirmation of the enthusiastic adoption of the messaging app by the worlds of fashion, media and entertainment.

Since Snapchat was introduced in 2011, its popularity and growth have been explosive. The service, known for its blurry self-destructing “snaps” that can be scribbled upon and that contrast starkly with the curated, filtered scenes found on rival image-based apps like Instagram, has become a powerful social media platform with a $ 16 billion valuation and rumored plans of a public offering. It currently delivers more than seven billion video clips a day among its 100 million active users, most of whom are between the ages of 18 and 24.

That last statistic is the most valuable for high-fashion brands, many of which have clamored to build a presence on Snapchat in the past 18 months in efforts to reach a new generation of so-called millennials.

And in an industry where social-media metrics are as much a barometer of success as the quality of styles seen on the catwalk, embracing the future has been crucial, despite Snapchat’s imperfect and unedited aesthetic, which is at odds with the idealized fashion values presented and peddled by the industry for five decades.

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Valentino, Stella McCartney, Louis Vuitton, Carolina Herrera and Michael Kors have all used Snapchat to offer behind-the-scenes glimpses of their women’s wear shows in the past 12 months. Burberry, often an early adopter of new media approaches, posted teasers to the service before its London Fashion Week show — alongside quirky cameos from front-row stars like the Vogue editor Anna Wintour and the model Cara Delevingne.

But how to accurately measure the commercial value of campaigns that vanish after 24 hours? Labels insist that creating Snapchat stories — like all social-media marketing — is less about driving short-term sales than it is about building long-term brand equity. But after flashy and much-trumpeted arrivals on the platform, companies such as Louis Vuitton and Michael Kors went quiet, and some industry experts say the fashion world needs inspiration to turn that camera flash into cold, hard cash.

“Fashion brands are definitely still becoming acquainted with the platform,” said Sarah Owen, a youth editor for trends at the forecasting network WGSN.

Figures like Ms. Hadid and Kylie Jenner are proving to be more nimble on Snapchat than the brands they represent when it comes to winning the hearts and minds of millennials. When it comes to financial returns, it is the unexpected new wave of underground “influencers” — rather than billion-dollar companies — that appear to be reaping concrete rewards, via old-fashioned product endorsements.

Take DJ Khaled, 40, a hip-hop producer who also happens to have one of the most popular Snapchat accounts on the planet. His proficiency on the platform — “a combination of inspirational talk, outrageous adventures and mundane minutiae of life,” according to Jon Caramanica of The New York Times — has won him an army of followers. Around two million viewers watch every snap.

As a result, he is building a fashion empire — he has his own fashion label, he tries out new sneakers sent to him by celebrity friends like the singer Kanye West, he has luxury gifts delivered: Hublot sent him some custom watches midsnap this weekend.

Photo

DJ Khaled, 40, a DJ and hip- hop producer who has one of the most popular Snapchat accounts in the world.

Mr. Khaled’s success is built on the fact that he has realized that paid placements are too obvious for today’s teenagers and 20-somethings; the strategy has to speak more authentically. Perhaps that’s why Snapchat is also generating serious money for teenage amateurs who are not only adopting his techniques but also “reselling” fashion products online.

DJ Khaled’s personal sneaker plugger, for example, a 16-year-old high school student from Miami who goes by the name Benjamin Kickz on social media, says he has made a million dollars from his online business, which boomed after he started supplying rappers and A-listers with sought-after footwear.

Benjamin Kickz began by buying in bulk — and then reselling — rare or in-demand sneakers at a premium. His strategy was built on forging partnerships with local wholesalers to release products to him first, and that resulted in him catching the eyes of celebrities on Snapchat and Instagram.

Charles Fitchew, a 12-year-old in Manchester, England, said that neither he nor any of his friends followed brands on Snapchat, but that they have followed people “close to the streetwear brands” who snap product drop dates and where items can be bought.

“And gradually, I realized I could set up a similar sort of business myself, by selling sneakers from my account — last week alone I made 300 pounds,” or about $ 434, he said. “If someone famous posts a snapchat of themselves wearing a shoe, then the price goes up by a third overnight. There is a fashion business booming on Snapchat and anyone can have a hand in it.”

Everyone, it would appear, but the brands themselves.

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Use the Internet to find medical advice at your own risk https://oneherald.com.au/use-the-internet-to-find-medical-advice-at-your-own-risk-2/ https://oneherald.com.au/use-the-internet-to-find-medical-advice-at-your-own-risk-2/#respond Sat, 30 Jan 2016 06:52:58 +0000 http://oneherald.com.au/use-the-internet-to-find-medical-advice-at-your-own-risk-2/ DAILY NEWS CONTRIBUTOR Friday, January 29, 2016, 9:05 PM Dr. Samadi says people need to be extremely careful when using the Internet for medical advice. Many people use Google for their medical advice instead of asking their doctor. According to a study, only 43.5% of websites provided accurate information. The rest were either inaccurate or ...

The post Use the Internet to find medical advice at your own risk first appeared on One Herald.

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DAILY NEWS CONTRIBUTOR

Friday, January 29, 2016, 9:05 PM

Dr. Samadi says people need to be extremely careful when using the Internet for medical advice.

Dr. Samadi says people need to be extremely careful when using the Internet for medical advice.

Many people use Google for their medical advice instead of asking their doctor. According to a study, only 43.5% of websites provided accurate information. The rest were either inaccurate or irrelevant.

The most accurate sites were from government organizations, which were found to be accurate 80.1% of the time. The least accurate websites are blogs, found to be only accurate 30.9% of the time.

This is a major problem, and health care providers need to be aware of the extent to which patients turn to the Internet for information about their care and then act on that advice, regardless of the reliability of the source.

If you are going to search for medical advice on Google, double-check the sources’ validity before acting on the advice. Websites ending in .gov or.org or .state are accurate and reputable sources.

You should avoid personal blogs, as incorrect information is worse than no information at all.

That’s not to say all the internet is bad, it’s okay to use Google for health questions if you use a credible source and if it prompts you to visit your doctor should you have concerns.

The Internet is best for choosing the right physician, narrowing down your choices and doing online background checks — not for self-diagnosis.

Once you have a general idea of the kind of doctor you need, where you would like to see them, and how much you are willing to pay, you can narrow down your list by some more of your personal preferences.

Do you prefer a male or female doctor? Do you feel more comfortable with an older or younger physician? If English is not your first language, would you prefer a multilingual doctor?

Sometimes the easiest way to find out more about a doctor is to google them. Although information online needs to be viewed with a grain of salt, it can help you get to know a doctor better before even meeting them.

You can check their board certification, negative reports associated with their medical license, and online reviews to see what other patients have to say.

It is important to choose doctors with whom you feel comfortable. Speak to someone who specializes in treating your condition.

From all the info you have gathered from the Internet and your research, it is time for you to go to your doctor with this information and get to know the facts.

Discuss and learn everything about your condition with your medical team. Ask any and every question until you feel comfortable. Discuss your medical conditions. Tell your doctor if you have any health issues, including heart or lung disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, dental work, arthritis, or drug allergies.

DO

– Check with your doctor about any health concerns before following online advice

– Use a government or organization website

– Double-check all facts found online

– Use common sense when following online advice

DON’T

– Rely on blogs for information

– Just assume your symptoms are like everybody else’s

– Self-diagnose

– Fall for gimmicky marketing: if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is

Dr. Samadi is a board-certified urologic oncologist trained in open and traditional and laparoscopic surgery, and an expert in robotic prostate surgery. He is chairman of urology, chief of robotic surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital and professor of urology at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine. He is a medical correspondent for the Fox News Channel’s Medical A-Team and the chief medical correspondent for am970 in New York City, where he is heard Sundays at 10 a.m.

Learn more at roboticoncology.com and SamadiMD.com. Follow Dr. Samadi on Twitter and Facebook.

For more DAILY VIEWS, The News’ new contributor network, click here.

Tags:
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Lifestyle – NY Daily News

The post Use the Internet to find medical advice at your own risk first appeared on One Herald.

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Use the Internet to find medical advice at your own risk https://oneherald.com.au/use-the-internet-to-find-medical-advice-at-your-own-risk/ https://oneherald.com.au/use-the-internet-to-find-medical-advice-at-your-own-risk/#respond Sat, 30 Jan 2016 06:47:32 +0000 http://oneherald.com.au/use-the-internet-to-find-medical-advice-at-your-own-risk/ DAILY NEWS CONTRIBUTOR Friday, January 29, 2016, 9:05 PM Dr. Samadi says people need to be extremely careful when using the Internet for medical advice. Many people use Google for their medical advice instead of asking their doctor. According to a study, only 43.5% of websites provided accurate information. The rest were either inaccurate or ...

The post Use the Internet to find medical advice at your own risk first appeared on One Herald.

]]>

DAILY NEWS CONTRIBUTOR

Friday, January 29, 2016, 9:05 PM

Dr. Samadi says people need to be extremely careful when using the Internet for medical advice.

Dr. Samadi says people need to be extremely careful when using the Internet for medical advice.

Many people use Google for their medical advice instead of asking their doctor. According to a study, only 43.5% of websites provided accurate information. The rest were either inaccurate or irrelevant.

The most accurate sites were from government organizations, which were found to be accurate 80.1% of the time. The least accurate websites are blogs, found to be only accurate 30.9% of the time.

This is a major problem, and health care providers need to be aware of the extent to which patients turn to the Internet for information about their care and then act on that advice, regardless of the reliability of the source.

If you are going to search for medical advice on Google, double-check the sources’ validity before acting on the advice. Websites ending in .gov or.org or .state are accurate and reputable sources.

You should avoid personal blogs, as incorrect information is worse than no information at all.

That’s not to say all the internet is bad, it’s okay to use Google for health questions if you use a credible source and if it prompts you to visit your doctor should you have concerns.

The Internet is best for choosing the right physician, narrowing down your choices and doing online background checks — not for self-diagnosis.

Once you have a general idea of the kind of doctor you need, where you would like to see them, and how much you are willing to pay, you can narrow down your list by some more of your personal preferences.

Do you prefer a male or female doctor? Do you feel more comfortable with an older or younger physician? If English is not your first language, would you prefer a multilingual doctor?

Sometimes the easiest way to find out more about a doctor is to google them. Although information online needs to be viewed with a grain of salt, it can help you get to know a doctor better before even meeting them.

You can check their board certification, negative reports associated with their medical license, and online reviews to see what other patients have to say.

It is important to choose doctors with whom you feel comfortable. Speak to someone who specializes in treating your condition.

From all the info you have gathered from the Internet and your research, it is time for you to go to your doctor with this information and get to know the facts.

Discuss and learn everything about your condition with your medical team. Ask any and every question until you feel comfortable. Discuss your medical conditions. Tell your doctor if you have any health issues, including heart or lung disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, dental work, arthritis, or drug allergies.

DO

– Check with your doctor about any health concerns before following online advice

– Use a government or organization website

– Double-check all facts found online

– Use common sense when following online advice

DON’T

– Rely on blogs for information

– Just assume your symptoms are like everybody else’s

– Self-diagnose

– Fall for gimmicky marketing: if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is

Dr. Samadi is a board-certified urologic oncologist trained in open and traditional and laparoscopic surgery, and an expert in robotic prostate surgery. He is chairman of urology, chief of robotic surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital and professor of urology at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine. He is a medical correspondent for the Fox News Channel’s Medical A-Team and the chief medical correspondent for am970 in New York City, where he is heard Sundays at 10 a.m.

Learn more at roboticoncology.com and SamadiMD.com. Follow Dr. Samadi on Twitter and Facebook.

For more DAILY VIEWS, The News’ new contributor network, click here.

Tags:
daily views


Health – NY Daily News

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