Home / Health / Domestic violence: Queensland government moves to strengthen laws

Domestic violence: Queensland government moves to strengthen laws


Queensland Police will be given the power to do more, quicker, when they believe people to be in danger of domestic and family violence, with the government pushing for nationwide reform.

After police questioned the increased paperwork the stronger focus on domestic and family violence was bringing, the government has rolled out further reforms, in legislation to be introduced later this week, which will simplify the process and expanding the powers of a Police Protection Order.


Stabbing deaths: a ‘blood soaked scene’

The “horrific” stabbing deaths of two women at a Gordonvale house prompts a plea by police for domestic violence victims and perpetrators to seek help.

Under the legislation, police will be able to act immediately if they judge an individual or, for the first time, a minor, to be in danger of domestic violence, with nine deaths already recorded in 2016. 

Clarification will also be given to ensure courts can make domestic violence orders, if someone has been threatened or is in fear for their safety, while simultaneously being asked to consider if more “tailored conditions” need to be included in the DVO. 

Under the legislation, police will be able to act immediately if they judge an individual or, for the first time, a ...
Under the legislation, police will be able to act immediately if they judge an individual or, for the first time, a minor, to be in danger of domestic violence. Photo: Wolter Peeters

Protection orders will remain in place for a minimum of five years, unless there are court-ordered reasons for a shorter order, while magistrates and judges will also be required to consider any family law orders to “minimise inconsistency between the orders”, and amend the family law order if necessary to ensure safety.

Government agencies will also be allowed to share information with specialist domestic and family violence officers across departments in an attempt to identify those who may be at risk, with Queensland also pushing for DVOs to be recognised across state borders as part of a National Domestic Violence Order Scheme.

“To do that we need to have the legislation in place and every jurisdiction has committed to introducing that legislation this year and I am very pleased that Queensland is taking that step this week with this bill,” Attorney-General Yvette D’Ath said.

“It is important though to note that it is just the first step – this is just putting the framework in place, so when the system is ready to go, the legislation is there to support it.  There is still a lot of work to be done, to establish the sharing system and the IT system across jurisdictions to actually get that operational.

“We are working on that. We hope we will have an interim solution in place to do that by the end of the year, but we need this legislation in place to ensure that that can occur.”

The legislation will be introduced during the coming week’s Parliament sitting.

For independent news coverage, be sure to follow our Facebook feed.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*